"Terminus" (2014) by artist Megan Mosholder

"Terminus" (2014) visualized Atlanta’s transportation past, present and future and New York City subway tunnels. It was a multi-media installation created from light, ribbon, string and video. Projection created by Pablo Gnecco, sound design by Adam Babar, armature construction by ExhibitCraft and photography by Steve Moraco. The audience was able to enter “Terminus” and traverse the artwork as if walking through a subway tunnel. This project considers what the city of Atlanta could become if their transportation issues were resolved. The piece was installed in Atlanta, Georgia at the Goat Farm Arts Center for the Hambidge Center of Creative Arts and Sciences Art Auction.
Testing open air projection with mayer+empl, Kaffeewerk Innstadt, Germany. —A. SUN

Testing open air projection with mayer+empl, Kaffeewerk Innstadt, Germany. A. SUN

(via alidasun)

Videomapping complex objects “Lucemforma” escultura + producción multimedia, dummy escala 

(Source: balunium)

Peppermill’s video art inspires awe for artistry, technology 
When you walk through the Peppermill Resort Spa Casino in Reno, you see hundreds of television screens showing captivating, high-definition videos of exotic lands, local scenery, nature, wildlife and fashion.
Designed to create a visual journey, each living-art video is from a collection of 50,000-plus images owned by the resort. Yes, you read that right — all of the images are shot, edited, produced and managed by the Peppermill’s in-house media staff.
This concept of “living art” or “video art” is the brainchild of Joe Ness, the resort’s director of the Entertainment Electronics and Media Department.

Peppermill’s video art inspires awe for artistry, technology

When you walk through the Peppermill Resort Spa Casino in Reno, you see hundreds of television screens showing captivating, high-definition videos of exotic lands, local scenery, nature, wildlife and fashion.

Designed to create a visual journey, each living-art video is from a collection of 50,000-plus images owned by the resort. Yes, you read that right — all of the images are shot, edited, produced and managed by the Peppermill’s in-house media staff.

This concept of “living art” or “video art” is the brainchild of Joe Ness, the resort’s director of the Entertainment Electronics and Media Department.

Video display narrates SA history

A new video art display in San Antonio details the city’s discovery and development.

Roberto Fazio’s Light Studio Brings Projection Mapping To The Next Level

When we interviewed Italian projection mapping artist Luca Agnani last week, he gave us a brief list of noteworthy peers he worked alongside at the City of Lights festival in Moscow, last fall. Some much needed insight, considering this relatively new iteration of spacial augmented reality is becoming more and more prominent in digital arts scenes the world over.

One name he emphasized was Roberto Fazio—an Italian digital artist with a studio based in Bologna. Agnani called him, rather matter-of-factly, a “guru” in the field. Naturally you’re left to skeptically contemplate such lofty terms with a see-it-to-believe-it attitude, but a quick search through Fazio’s portfolio reveals why a guy as celebrated in the Italian visual arts scene as Agnani would throw laurels his way.

Not only has Fazio cultured his own aesthetic touch—a style that incorporates negative space as a lever to increase the incandescence of his grid-heavy projections—but he’s even helped make the tools of his craft more accessible to artist communities by creating 3D mapping computer programs and hosting 101-type workshops at festivals internationally.

Great Videos

Bottom image Sample schematics from Element.Map, a 3D mapping open source program.

(Source: littlelimpstiff14u2)

No recuerdo que ninguno de los 3D Mapping que ahora están de moda me hayan gustado tanto como este. Vale los 8 minutos.

"City Life", hecho por The Electric Canvas.

(Source: felicidadincompleta)

Ryoji Ikeda + Carsten Nicolai “cyclo.id” at MOMA 2013

PopRally hosts the premiere U.S. performance of “cyclo.id.”, the collaborative project of artist/composers Ryoji Ikeda and Carsten Nicolai. Since their collaboration began in 1999, cyclo.’s work—live performances, CDs, books, and ongoing research—has focused on their shared interest in the visualization of sound. In conjunction with MoMA’s first major exhibition of sound art, Soundings: A Contemporary Score, in which Nicolai is a featured artist, the duo will stage a performance entitled cyclo.id. In a multisensory and immersive concert experience, cyclo. will perform against a backdrop of vibrant, ever-shifting visuals generated through real-time sound analysis.

In conjunction with the exhibition Soundings: A Contemporary Score http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1379

(Source: videoartexplorer)

Mantra II Unisono. Video & Mapping intervention by VjThai.

Exploring a universal frequency, where unity prevails.
Beyond consciousness, the essence.
_*_

MANTRA II is part of UNISONO, a series of ephemeral interventions of video & mapping by Roxana Barraza (VjThai) & Media Selectah.

…”part of the magic in the mantra consists in that you should not question about its meaning, because only then shall we trascend the fragmentary aspects of the conscious mind and perceive the subyacent unity…”
_*_

This is the first IRL exhibition of MANTRA, as part of the first session THAIFHAI nomad gallery. It consisted of an audiovisual intervention by Roxana Barraza (VjThai) & Projection Mapping by Media Selectah, that took place only for one night at a space in Escuela Adolfo Prieto, Centro de las Artes. Parque Fundidora, Monterrey, México. APRIL 2014.

Jim Sanborn - Topographic Projections and Implied Geomotries, 1995-97

  1. Cainville, Utah (1995)
  2. Notom, Utah (1995)
  3. Bandon, Oregon (1997)
  4. Kilkee County Claire, Ireland (1997)

(via exhibition-ism)

What’s Wrong with Video Art? The Multi-screen Installation
Last year I wrote an article on FAD about my issues with video art, the mistakes being made with it and how it could be improved –  have a read in the first in the series of what’s wrong with video art? But now something else is gaining favour in the world of art and the moving image, and that is the multi-screen installation.

What’s Wrong with Video Art? The Multi-screen Installation

Last year I wrote an article on FAD about my issues with video art, the mistakes being made with it and how it could be improved –  have a read in the first in the series of what’s wrong with video art? But now something else is gaining favour in the world of art and the moving image, and that is the multi-screen installation.

Glitchitecture
(by BRDG)

(via 0x4e71)

Video experiment ( documentation )

Stopmotion, Mad Line, Projection Map, Kinect.

(Source: bimodwipoalam)

Margaret Salmon, Study of man in truck based on the story John told me, 2010

Margaret Salmon, Study of man in truck based on the story John told me, 2010

(Source: et-alia)